Can I Make Iced Coffee With Hot Coffee in the Fridge? (A Better Approach Is Given)

2 min read

Can I Make Iced Coffee With Hot Coffee in the Fridge? (A Better Approach Is Given)

Sometimes we just want a batch of iced coffee and put it in the refrigerator, so we can drink anytime we want without the brewing procedure the following few days. I can speak from experience as a barista when I say that is not a great idea.

So, is it possible to put a hot cup of coffee in the refrigerator? Yes, but no. Of course, you are free to store whatever coffee you like in the refrigerator. Unless you seal it properly, the coffee will inevitably get stale, bitter, sour, and flavorless.

Why Do hot coffee iced in the fridge tastes so bad?

We can all agree that a refrigerator cannot cool things quickly enough if it is not a commercial freezer. Thus, storing coffee in the refrigerator is practically equivalent to leaving it out on the desk to cool and then referring to it as cold coffee. Simply said, it tastes bad.

The oxidation process is the cause of everything. Coffee that has been oxidized has a bitter flavor and a deeper color. As coffee ages, it becomes bitter. To disguise the unpleasant astringency, store-bought iced coffee frequently contains a lot of sugar and milk.

Things might be improving if you can switch from a cup to an airtight container like a mason jar. The process will proceed more quickly if you left your coffee outside, and to make matters worse, your coffee will begin to smell like other foods that have been in the refrigerator. Keep in mind that oxidation will proceed more slowly in containers with less air contact.

Instead, how can you make iced coffee at home?

make Iced coffee at home

The way we create iced coffee at my coffee shop is to prepare a huge batch of extremely concentrated hot coffee, pour it over ice to dilute and cool it down, and then immediately place it in the refrigerator. We pour this over and serve with extra ice cubes if a customer asks ice coffee. It truly has a pleasant flavor. 

You essentially divide the water you use to create pour-over coffee into two parts if you want to make iced coffee at home. The coffee is brewed using 60% hot water and 40% ice.

I made a pour-over using roughly 22g of coffee for 5oz of ice and 5oz of hot water, and I have to say that it is superior to even pure cold brew.

The hot coffee concentrate will be rapidly cooled down by the ice. Finally, more ice is added to further chill it, much like a cocktail.

I've found that because it's so diluted, the iced coffee won't be as potent or concentrated. It's supposed to be energizing and simple to drink, in my opinion. But it's delicious and great on sweltering summer days.

 

Conclusion


Can hot coffee be stored in the refrigerator? Yes, however in order to avoid oxidation, you must use an airtight container, such as a mason jar. However, the only way to get the most out of your coffee is to make your own fresh brew iced coffee.

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